Do you way tag education resource

Make your own temporary marks

Use this step by step guide to help you create your own symbols which can relate to wayfinding or to what you love about your local area. Then get out there and spray, creating a temporary tag on the landscape.

MAKE YOUR WAY worked with schools in Carluke, Glassford, Lanark, Larkhall and Stonehouse over six months to find creative, engaging ways of walking and exploring the Clyde and Avon Valley. During work in Larkhall, the team led Way Tagging workshops. Pupils of Robert Smillie and Craigbank Primary Schools had the chance to come up with their own tag symbols related to the local area and use chalk spray paint to add a splash of colour to the walks by Morgan Glen.

Have a go yourself by following this simple guide. Print and download your own copy by clicking under 'Other Resources'.

Skills involved:

  • Spraycan Art
  • Design
  • Direct Speech

WHAT IS TAGGING?*

*Information from http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/painting/graffiti-art.htm

Tagging is a term taken from the world of graffiti or spraycan art. Here are some more ideas and words linked to spraycan art:

TAGGING - The act of applying a tag or signature to a surface. These can be complex in content and appearance.

A ‘THROW UP’ - Larger than a tag and rapidly painted in just two or three colours.

A ‘PIECE’ - Elaborate and intricate work using a wider range of colours - can be wiped out very quickly by a rival artist with a simple ‘throw up’.

BLOCKBUSTER - a large block shaped work performed with a
paint-roller, done in order to protect an area from rival artists.

STENCIL GRAFFITI - Using cut outs for rapidly painting complex shapes. First used in the 1980s and more recently made famous by artists such as Banksy.

WILDSTYLE - More elaborate, with interlocking letters and
connected points. Sometimes creates an indecipherable tag.

LOOK AROUND FOR INSPIRATION

During Way Tagging activities with pupils , MAKE YOUR WAY encouaged pupils to look at the green spaces and outdoor areas around them, thinking about what they can SEE and DO, and how they EXPERIENCE the wonderful wooded areas, paths and rivers of the Clyde and Avon Valley.

Think about the area you want to tag: what can you do here, what can you see? How do you FEEL about this place?

Step 1. Design your symbol

Step 1. Design your symbol

Step 1. Design your symbol

Now for the fun part! Grab your can and get close to the stencil. Hold the can a few inches from the stencil and spray evenly, continually moving across the surface of stencil - again less is more and you want a nice even layer of paint. Lift the stencil up and appreciate your handy work.

Repeat the process - you can make a line along the path or mark tags at intervals to create waymarkers! Use different colours or mixes of colours and feel free to experiment. Bright, vibrant colours work best in the outdoors.

Step 2. Draw symbol on stencil film

Step 2. Draw symbol on stencil film

Step 2. Draw symbol on stencil film

Once you have had a few goes at practicing different designs on rough paper, and are sure of what you want, it’s time to draw out your stencil.

Get a permanent black marker and draw your symbol at a good size, leaving plenty of ‘gutter’ space around the symbol to catch the paint later during spraying - you don’t want all your tags to have a box around them.

Step 3. Cut out stencil

Step 3. Cut out stencil

Using a craft knife or scissors, cut out the symbol from the stencil. Take your time to make sure you only cut out the symbol and don’t tear the stencil film. You are now ready to get out there and spray!

Step 4. Find a place to spray

Step 4. Find a place to spray

Step 4. Find a place to spray

Find to an outdoor space - a paved pathway, a wall, a fence - somewhere public where you have permission to spray. Get the chalk spray ready giving it a solid shake - feel free to jump around - making sure the nozzle is not in the can until after you have shaken it.

Time to get on your protective gear: pop your mask then goggles over your head, and pull on your gloves. This can be messy work (although the chalk will wash off) so it is best to stay well covered.

Take a brush and clear the area you want to spray. Lay your stencil down flat and pin the corners down (the cans you are not using at that moment can be useful for this) to make sure the wind doesn’t blow the stencil away.

Step 5. Spray your way tag!

Step 5. Spray your way tag!

Step 5. Spray your way tag!

Now for the fun part! Grab your can and get close to the stencil. Hold the can a few inches from the stencil and spray evenly, continually moving across the surface of stencil - again less is more and you want a nice even layer of paint. Lift the stencil up and appreciate your handy work.

Repeat the process - you can make a line along the path or mark tags at intervals to create waymarkers! Use different colours or mixes of colours and feel free to experiment. Bright, vibrant colours work best in the outdoors.

Or! Try making some luggage tags instead

Or! Try making some luggage tags instead

Or! Try making some luggage tags instead

Alternatively you can try creating corex luggage tags with messages about your local area.

You can also make more simple tags about what you love in the green spaces, parks and woods nearby. Think about direct speech: what is your experience of playing in the woods, running around: what can you SEE, DO and FEEL? Here is an example from Robert Smillie Primary School, Larkhall.

STAY SOCIAL

Keep up to date with further projects and share your ideas online using #MakeYourWay

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClydeandAvonValley/ 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/ClydeAvonValley

Instagram: www.instagram.com/clydeavonvalley/

Make Your Way is an arts, heritage and active travel campaign, focusing on the communities of Carluke, Glassford, Lanark, Larkhall and Stonehouse, in 2016 – 17. It was delivered by icecream architecture and SYSTRA, with support  from Smarter Choices, Smarter Places grant and is part of the Heritage Lottery Fund supported Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership scheme.

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